Challenges of Transferring Data between Healthcare Institutions

Everyone hopes that if you have a medical emergency, that the hospital treating you will be able to gain immediate access to your medical records. The truth is that unless you are fortunate enough to be treated by our local hospital where you have been treated before, your medical records may not be readily available. Interoperability Interoperability refers to the ability of computerized systems to connect and communicate with one another, even if they were developed by different manufacturers. Being able to exchange information between applications, databases, and other computer systems is crucial for the healthcare. Interoperability has to do with the capability of disparate computer and software systems to exchange and share data from a range of sources, including laboratories, clinics, pharmacies, hospitals, and medical practices. For example if a physician sends a patient to a radiology clinic for a complex fracture, the physician should be able to send the patients records to the clinic and the clinic should be able to send the results back to the patient’s physicians. However, several challenges still bar stakeholders from achieving true interoperability for optimal care delivery and improved patient health outcomes. One of the main issues is the lack of standardization in identifying individual patients.  If you can’t properly identify the patient, how can you be sure that you are transferring the right information. Master Patient Indexes Recently,  establishing an enterprise master patient index has been thought to be the answer to this problem. A recent study by Black Book Research found that hospitals without an enterprise master patient index had an average of 18% duplicate records in their EHR system. This duplication caused repeated medical care costing a reported average of $1950 per patient per [...]

State HIEs need Absolute Patient Identification to be Successful

Last month, Wyoming announced that they were establishing the Wyoming Frontier Information Exchange. It is being built to become a centralized clinical data repository for participating vendors. According to James Bush, MD, Wyoming Medicaid medical director, “Currently, providers ae struggling to coordinate care due to limited patient information. By forming the statewide HIE, we can build a community of health that will securely place comprehensive, usable data in the hands of our healthcare providers.” Data quality within the HIE The AHIMA reports that the average duplicate health record rate at a healthcare facility is between 8 and 12 percent. CHIME reports that the health record error rate is usually closer to 10 to 20 percent within a healthcare entity and it rises to 50 to 60 percent when entities exchange with each other. For an HIE to be successful, healthcare entities must make sure that they are sharing data for the right patient. Using an absolute healthcare identity system will ensure the data being shared is for the right patient. Patient identity systems that use a combination of smart card, bio-metric identification, and cloud-based security technologies to ensure accurate patient identity each time a patient receives care. Much like a modern debit card, the micro-chipped  smart cards cannot be copied without considerable resources. It also cannot be swapped or borrowed, like health insurance or social security cards. By presenting a smart card, patients quickly can prove their identity beyond a doubt at any participating facility. Building an HIE network Dr. Bush plans for the Wyoming Frontier Information Exchange to expand to offer interstate connectivity with other providers, offering the potential for greater information sharing. He hopes his HIE will become a regional HIE, including Colorado, Utah, South Dakota [...]

When Are Patient Registration Errors Most Likely to Occur?

A John Hopkin’s study titled: Implementing and Sustaining Improvement in Healthcarefound that an astounding 92% of patient identity errors occur at the time of the registration process. The registration process is understandably complex and requires great attention to detail. However, a busy waiting room, unfamiliar temporary staff, or inadequate workflow procedures can result in duplicate records or complete patient misidentification. The John’s Hopkins study determined that inadequate emphasis was placed on the process of patient identification in the registrar training materials. Types of patient registration errors you are likely to see Patient registration errors can appear in several ways: General misidentification can lead to duplicate records in the EHR system. Patients often present with different names at different times (Robert at one time and Bob the next). This inconsistency can also lead to duplicate records or patient misidentification. Several studies have indicated that errors happen more frequently with foreign names. They found that Hispanic, Vietnamese, Korean, Chinese, Navajo and Arabic names were more likely to be false positives in their analyses of duplicate records. The authors suggested that it was likely that ethnic names, unfamiliar to registration clerks and other hospital staff, would have increased occurrences of misspellings. Also, the fields for each person’s name consisted of a first name, middle name, and last name, which may be unsuitable in many cultures. 2016 ECRI study found that over half of patient misidentification dealt with either diagnostic procedures (36.5%)or treatment (22%). Documentation problems accounted for an additional 10%. Cost of patient registration errors Patient registration errors can lead to medical errors which are both physically harmful to the patient and financially harmful to the healthcare provider. Permanente of Southern California has over 10,000 records of people named Maria Gonzales. HIMSS has estimated that 8-14% [...]

25 Seconds Can Save Hospitals $30 Million with Patient ID Systems

Did you know that the average hospital system has a 10% duplicate error rate and it costs about $100 to correct each error? If your healthcare facility has 500,000 registrations each year, that’s 50,000 errors and you spend about $5M correcting those errors. Did you know that the average hospital loses $17M in billing errors every year, primarily due to patient identity errors? In the Ponemon Institute’s 2016 survey, hospitals stated that an average of 35%of all denied claims were a result of inaccurate patient identification. This represented an estimated value of over $17M per year per hospital. Did you know that patient mis-identification also contributes to lost productivity for clinicians? The Ponemon Institute’s 2016 survey also stated that the average clinician wastes almost 30 minutes per shift due to patient mis-identification. This misidentification costs the average healthcare organization $900,000 per year in lost productivity. Did you know that there are over 2 million incidences of medical identity fraud every year? With 5,627 hospitals in the US, that is 355 potential incidents of medical identity fraud in each hospital. The average cost of medical identity fraud is around $13,500 per incident, which calculates to around $4.8M per year per hospital. With modern absolute patient ID techniques, there is no reason why medical identity theft still exists. Did you know that spending 25 seconds with a biometric patient id system can save you almost $30M a year? 25 seconds is all it takes for a biometric patient id system to accurately identify a registered patient, preventing duplicate registrations and the need to correct them. Patient ID systems play a critical role in helping providers reduce billing errors and collection problems associated with patient identity mistakes. Absolute patient id systems can save your healthcare organization millions [...]

Meeting Health IT Standards for Patient Misidentification

Government agencies establish industry-wide standards for best practices in healthcare. With the ubiquitous use of EHR systems and other digitally-accessible record software, it’s important to align staff members and make preserving patient data integrity a priority. The first thing that practices often notice about following these standards, however, is that it takes a lot of work and process changes to be effective. The good news is that there are additional technologies that make implementing those standards easier. Patient identification systems reduce the work and vigilance required from clinical staff while also improving the usability of EHR. Consider the Privasent Absolute Identity solution, which pairs two methods of positive patient identification with your EHR system to maximize security and convenience at the same time. The first component of Privasent is a palm vein scanner, which leverages a patient’s biometrics to recover their health record. The second component is an encrypted smart card, which is assigned to the patient upon their initial entry into the system. From that point on, the smart card can conveniently be presented at any participating facility within their provider network. It makes registration faster and also guarantees the correct record will be retrieved from the EHR system. Both of these technologies make patient record entry more accurate and reduce duplication errors, which aligns with the same initiatives set forth by HealthIT.gov. Government-Recommended Practices for Eliminating Patient Misidentification HealthIT.gov created the SAFER guide (Safety Assurance Factors for EHR Resilience) to help medical practices emphasize patient safety through data entry. The guide provides recommendations that, when implemented, prevent patient record duplication and inaccuracies when logging clinical information. To review the recommendations, view the Self Assessment PDF or take a look at the summary we’ve provided below. 1. Build a Master Patient [...]

By | 2017-10-25T17:45:39+00:00 Tuesday, April 4, 2017|Categories: Absolute Identity|Tags: , |0 Comments